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Medical Imaging

Beautiful on the Inside: These Machines Reveal the Secrets of the Body

If a good picture is worth a thousand words, then these images are visual equivalent of War and Peace. GE imaging technology – from MRI machines to high-resolution microscopes – offers incredibly detailed snapshots of the body all the way down to the cellular level.

It doesn’t benefit just patients, but also gives us a clearer picture of the past and future. With a CT scan, for example, you can discover what a 3,000-year-old mummy ate based on its bone density. Using a super resolution microscope, you can watch the HIV virus jump from cell to cell. An ultrasound machine can allow you to watch your child’s facial expressions before it’s even born. Take a look.

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Top and above: These images of the skull and the vessels and arteries that supply the brain with blood were taken by the superfast Revolution CT machine. Image credit: GE Healthcare

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Doctors use ultrasound technology to study organs and functions of the fetus like the structure of the brain and the working of the heart. GIF credit: GE Healthcare

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Doctors call the super-resolution DeltaVision OMX microscope “OMG” because the images it can take. Above an image of a dividing cell. Image credit: Jane Stout, Indiana University

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A new software for ultrasound scanning called cSound allows doctors to observe the heart in 3D. “It’s like opening the chest and seeing the heart beating,” says cardiologist Bijoy Khandheria.

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GE has been making X-ray tubes for more than a century. Scientists used them to study mummies at the 1939 World’s Fair in New York. Image credit: New York Public Library

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Cytell is an intuitive and relatively inexpensive imaging system that fits on a lab bench and allows researchers to quickly analyze and visualize routine samples, from insect limbs down to cells. Above is an image of lingual papillae, the hair-like structures located on the top of the tongue. Image credit: Gary Sarkis, GE Healthcare Life Sciences

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Last year, GE Healthcare celebrated the International Day of Radiology by scanning 100 everyday objects. Here’s an MRI image of cauliflower. Image credit: GE Healthcare

 

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