Skip to main content
Press Release

GE launches first national Australian advertising campaign "What a difference two letters can make"

June 20, 2011

Campaign represents increased focus on local market

Sydney -- Australia, 20 June 2011: GE today announced the launch of its first ever national advertising campaign in Australia, "Two Letters". The multi-million dollar national campaign signals a significant shift in GE‟s global strategy and an increased focus on the Australian market, with particular emphasis on healthcare and sustainability.

"GE has been in Australia since 1902 when we installed a GE electric motor to open the Pyrmont Bridge, which is still operating today," said Steve Sargent, President and CEO of GE in Australia and New Zealand. "Globally, Australia is one of our most important markets. We‟re investing heavily here and we see terrific opportunities for growth," he said.

Advertisements will span TV, outdoor, print and online media, kicking off with a 45 second TV commercial debuting on Sunday 19 June. The campaign will run through to the end of the year.

"This advertising campaign demonstrates the broad scope of our business in Australia and communicates our business strategy, which is about helping solve some of Australia‟s challenges through innovation," said Emma Rugge-Price, VP of Communications for GE Australia and New Zealand.

"The "Two Letters" campaign highlights what GE is about -- innovation in affordable healthcare, cleaner energy and transportation technology as well as customer-focused financial services.

"In the infrastructure space globally our business strategy is led by our sustainable energy initiative, ecomagination, and our healthcare initiative, healthymagination. The advertising campaign launched today demonstrates how these initiatives are touching the lives of Australians, and will increasingly do so in the future," she said.

The creative theme is 'What a difference two letters can make', highlighting that advanced technology and innovation can make a big difference to Australia.

The campaign is made up four print and three TV advertisements which include the same amount of special effects as a modern full length feature film. The visuals featured in the campaign include:

  • A GEnx jet engine -- one of the most advanced jet engines in the world that delivers 20% more fuel efficiency to help customers reduce their carbon footprint. With their long history in jet engine technology, GE has developed a more advanced wind turbine that creates more watts from less wind to help power Australia with cleaner energy;
  • A breakthrough pocket-sized ultrasound device called Vscan, which brings mobility to medical services allowing doctors to see inside the body wherever they are and improving access to advanced healthcare in remote and rural areas;
  • A GE PET/CT scanner which combines two powerful medical imaging technologies to produce high-definition images that can help doctors detect and treat cancer in its early stages; and
  • GE water purification plants off the Great Barrier Reef that purify more than 70 million litres of wastewater every day to help protect/preserve one of Australia‟s natural wonders.

Creative for the campaign was done by Clemenger BBDO, the ad space buying by M2M and special effects by Fuel VFX, the company working with Ridley Scott on his next feature film.

"GE is one of the world‟s largest and most innovative companies; they have so many great stories to tell that it was hard to know where to start!" said Andy Pontin, Chief Executive Officer at Clemenger BBDO Sydney.

"Australia is an incredibly important market for GE, and the campaign is the start of GE becoming recognised as a key player in Australia‟s economic prosperity. The work is really about highlighting the amazing but often unrecognised role that GE plays in the lives of all Australians".

To view the new GE TV commercial and the "making of" documentary, visit www.imaginationatwork.com.au.

Emma_ Rugge-Price
VP Communications
[email protected]
+612-8249-3529
+61-420-258-334


business unit
tags