The GE Show is here to help us understand the technologies that are changing our lives.

01

episode one

Healthy Hospitals

segment one : THE ISSUE

Got four hours to spare? Not many of us do. Our days are already crammed with work and personal responsibilities. We're on the go, and time is precious. Yet four hours is the time we spend for an average emergency department visit. And much of that time is spent waiting for a doctor, a room or paperwork. It's a serious problem that calls for serious thinking.

People spend too much time in the emergency department. This is a day in the life of the average American. Not much time to spare in those 24 hours for a hospital visit.
Study after study ranks Americans as some of the most productive and active people in the world. What can I say, we're busy. Not a lot of extra time for the unforeseen. Sometimes accidents happen, and we need the help of medical professionals quickly. Unfortunately the average visit to the emergency room takes 4 hours. If you're like most people, it's 4 hours you just don't have.We just spend too much time in the emergency department. So, why does it take so long, and what can be done about it? In this episode of the GE show, we aim to find out...


segment two : PATIENT TEAM

Doctors, nurses, caregivers. Those are the people we think of first when we think about hospitals. But there's a whole team working behind the scenes that's essential to the running of a hospital. They manage every aspect of the patients' journey to wellness, from intake to discharge.

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Once you arrive in the the emergency room, patients are cared for by an entire team of professionals and if the patient flow is not managed right, there can be serious delays. To better understand how emergency department wait-times are managed, we met with the staff at Glens Falls Hospital, in upstate New York, and asked them to help us better understand how hospitals cope with the demand.

segment three : PATIENT SHUFFLE

There's more to running a hospital than putting patients in rooms with doctors. Actually, that is a big part of it. But the problem is that there are lots of patients, but not so many rooms and doctors, so scheduling and planning are crucial. see how you handle the challenge.

There's more to running a hospital than putting patients in rooms with doctors. Actually, that is a big part of it. But the problem is that there are lots of patients, but not so many rooms and doctors, so scheduling and planning are crucial. see how you handle the challenge.


segment four : PAPER TIGER

It slows the speed of care, ties up staff, and costs millions. It's paper. GE's Centricity is a bundle of IT solutions that streamlines hospital administration processes, including replacing paper with Electronic Medical Records. It saves money, which is nice. And it can help improve the level of care patients get, which is priceless. That's technology solving a very human problem.

Little things add up. Time and money saved means medical staff have more resources to provide better patient care.

We are starting to understand just how tricky it can be to manage an emergency department. One of the major bottlenecks in the process is something very simple.
Paper medical records.
Take a look at some of the differences between paper and electronic medical records, and see how overhauling a system we've used in hospitals for decades could increase efficiency, save money, and improve overall patient care. 


segment five : HEALTH TOMORROW

Demand for healthcare is growing as our population ages. To meet that demand, we'll need more efficient hospital systems. See how GE is working on integrated solutions that tackle the needs of hospitals today and help get them ready for a very busy tomorrow.

Download video (mp4)

Kunter Ackbay, a principle engineer at The GE Global Research Center, is helping to develop solutions for the future of hospitals.


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